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David Chandler's Journal of Java Web and Mobile Development

  • David M. Chandler


    Web app developer since 1994 and former Developer Advocate with Google now residing in Colorado. Besides tech, I enjoy landscape photography and share my work at ColoradoPhoto.gallery.

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Posts Tagged ‘cross platform compatibility’

Is the mobile Web ready for business app developers?

Posted by David Chandler on March 15, 2012

Disclaimer: these thoughts are my own, not necessarily those of my employer.

I recently attended A Night with Sencha and Ted Patrick, and it got me thinking more about the mobile web. Mobile developers are clearly hungry for cross-platform solutions like Sencha and Titanium, and HTML5 promises significant cross-platform compatibility. (Action game developers, you can stop reading now because you already know that the high-performance mobile Web is not there yet. In fact, many folks I talked to last week at GDC are not even using the Android SDK, but rather the Android Native Development Kit to port games from iOS in C.)

Having said that, the mobile web for business app developers is arguably the easiest way to develop mobile apps, period, even without the side benefit of cross-platform compatibility. Why?

  • Web development frameworks is a rich and mature space. There are dozens of well-established popular frameworks on both client and server for MVC, CSS, JSON, etc. We’ve been doing Web development for almost 20 years now.
  • Web design tools abound. Although IDEs for native apps offer design & layout functionality, more designers are familiar with tools like Dreamweaver for HMTL+CSS. Firebug and Chrome DevTools are the ultimate WYSIWYG editors. Who wants to learn another style language when you’ve finally conquered CSS (kicking and screaming)?
  • Mobile browsers, like their desktop cousins, offer great tools for design and debugging (such as Safari Web Inspector and remote debugging with Chrome Beta for Android). Tools like the Window Resizer Chrome extension let you quickly test your app in a variety of different resolutions.
  • Frameworks like Sencha do a lot of the heavy lifting around RPC, local storage, dynamic UI creation & data binding. These things take a lot of work to do correctly in a native app.
  • You don’t have to worry as much about device compatibility. Mobile browsers aren’t perfect and there are still compatibility gaps (see mobilehtml5.org), but most players in the ecosystem are motivated to ensure that the browser runs well on all devices. The ecosystem is probably less concerned with your apartment finder app. Provided you’re using standard browser features, the browser vendor bears much of the testing burden.

So why does anyone write native apps?

  • Monetization, of course. But you can wrap your app in a WebView. As far as I know, WebViews aren’t an issue in any of the app markets with the possible exception of Apple, and according to Ted Patrick, Apple has been good about letting WebView apps in “once they get to know you and find that your app is reliable.” YMMV.
  • Native look and feel. Sencha / jqTouch does a convincing job with this on iOS. I haven’t seen it on Android.
  • Performance. I already mentioned this with respect to fast-moving games, but most business apps don’t use Canvas or a lot of CSS transitions. And with care, even large apps that manage a lot of data (like mobile GMail for the Web) can be snappy.
  • Hardware access. With HTML5, you can get the user’s location and even the accelerometer, but not the camera. At least not yet. But for most business apps, location is all you need.
  • Integration with the OS. If your app needs a ContentProvider or background Service or handles Intents, then you do indeed need a native app. Several well-known apps are succeeding with a hybrid approach, however, by using WebViews for rendering and native Services for data access. This simplifies the UI design as noted earlier while retaining other advantages of the platform.
  • Finally, native apps let you write code in something other than Javascript. Of course, you could try GWT or Dart and compile to JS, too. Ironically, many of the native cross-platform solutions also require you to write your app in Javascript.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be porting my listwidget app to native Android and mobile Web using a variety of technologies. I’ll keep you posted.

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Posted in Android, Dart, Google Web Toolkit | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

 
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